Harlequin Books
Q & A with Patricia Thayer!
Q: What makes babies and children excellent secondary characters in romance novels?
A.  First I’m going to steal a line from a 1950’s television host, Art Linkletter.  ‘Kids say the darnest things’.  
In other words, children get away with saying things we can’t.  And they say it simply, and get to the point which as we know our hero and heroine don’t always do.   And the best part, we can make those little darlings disappear when we want, too.
My stories are about family.  How they live and work together on the ranch, building a life for future generations.  I wrote ten books in my Texas Brotherhood series.   How the Randell brothers came back home, and worked together to keep the ranch.  I’ve had a hero delivering a baby, another just learning he was a father, another stepping in to replace a bad father.  Babies and children are a huge part of life, and as writers we embrace that.                
In my new series, A Quilt Shop In Kerry Springs, it’s about a small town in Texas surrounded by ranches and wineries.  The children add emotion and honesty to these stories.  The first book, Little Cowgirl Needs A Mom, eight-year-old Gracie Rafferty had lost her mom and is desperate to fulfill a promise to her.  My heroine, Jenny Collins, comes to the rescue and brings her together with the hero, Matt.                     
Don’t get me wrong, my stories are about the hero and heroine, but since you asked me, I don’t think there is anything sexier than the hero holding a baby in his big, strong arms.  Just look at Brad Pitt.   

Q & A with Patricia Thayer!

Q: What makes babies and children excellent secondary characters in romance novels?

A.  First I’m going to steal a line from a 1950’s television host, Art Linkletter.  ‘Kids say the darnest things’.  

In other words, children get away with saying things we can’t.  And they say it simply, and get to the point which as we know our hero and heroine don’t always do.   And the best part, we can make those little darlings disappear when we want, too.

My stories are about family.  How they live and work together on the ranch, building a life for future generations.  I wrote ten books in my Texas Brotherhood series.   How the Randell brothers came back home, and worked together to keep the ranch.  I’ve had a hero delivering a baby, another just learning he was a father, another stepping in to replace a bad father.  Babies and children are a huge part of life, and as writers we embrace that.                

In my new series, A Quilt Shop In Kerry Springs, it’s about a small town in Texas surrounded by ranches and wineries.  The children add emotion and honesty to these stories.  The first book, Little Cowgirl Needs A Mom, eight-year-old Gracie Rafferty had lost her mom and is desperate to fulfill a promise to her.  My heroine, Jenny Collins, comes to the rescue and brings her together with the hero, Matt.                     

Don’t get me wrong, my stories are about the hero and heroine, but since you asked me, I don’t think there is anything sexier than the hero holding a baby in his big, strong arms.  Just look at Brad Pitt.