Harlequin Books
Q&A with author Karen Rose Smith!
Q: Why does the Cinderella story never get old?
A: Once upon a time there was a woman who dreamt of dressing up in a beautiful gown, wearing magnificent jewelry and spectacular shoes. But most of all she dreamt of a handsome man gazing at her as if she were the most special woman in his life. The Cinderella fairytale is for the young and old and every age in between. A man proposing on bended knee declaring his love in front of the world brings tears to our eyes.
Why? Because loving and being loved seems to drive women to search for Prince Charming and men to search for their Cinderella. The more hectic the world becomes both men and women need a soft place to fall­that one person who is supportive, respectful and loving through thick and thin.
Commitment and marriage vows are integral to the Cinderella dream. The Cinderella fairytale never grows old because dreams give us hope. We pass down fairytales from generation to generation and along with them the belief that love can truly conquer all.

Q&A with author Karen Rose Smith!

Q: Why does the Cinderella story never get old?

A: Once upon a time there was a woman who dreamt of dressing up in a beautiful gown, wearing magnificent jewelry and spectacular shoes. But most of all she dreamt of a handsome man gazing at her as if she were the most special woman in his life. The Cinderella fairytale is for the young and old and every age in between. A man proposing on bended knee declaring his love in front of the world brings tears to our eyes.

Why? Because loving and being loved seems to drive women to search for Prince Charming and men to search for their Cinderella. The more hectic the world becomes both men and women need a soft place to fall­that one person who is supportive, respectful and loving through thick and thin.

Commitment and marriage vows are integral to the Cinderella dream. The Cinderella fairytale never grows old because dreams give us hope. We pass down fairytales from generation to generation and along with them the belief that love can truly conquer all.

Q&A with Marie Ferrarella!
Q: What makes babies and children excellent secondary characters in romance novels?
A: I believe that the women who read these books either have families or would like to have families and nothing says “family” like children.
The use of children allows me to show certain traits in either the hero or heroine. Is he (or she) a harried person who suddenly must care for a foundling or a recently deceased relative’s child? How does he or she measure up to this challenge?  We go through a learning process with him (or her) that, if done right, is equal parts touching and funny and the reader, as well as the involved heroine or hero, gets to learn things about the other person that might not come out otherwise. It makes for a richer story and allows for a great many plot devices.  My very favourite example of this is not from a book but actually the first episode of Full House in which the hero’s best friend and brother-in-law have to change the baby’s full diaper for the very first time.  Tongs, an entire roll of paper towels, a turkey baster filled with water and a kitchen sink are involved.  Very funny, yet very heart-warming.  You take to the two characters on the spot!
When you come right down to it, I love writing about children.  They’re honest and speak from the heart.  Personally, I’ve always been a pushover for short people myself.  They come to my door with long faces and I wind up buying an entire year’s supply of double-sided, foil wrapping paper that their schools have them hawking and I really have no use for. But the short people leave happy and that’s all that counts.

Q&A with Marie Ferrarella!

Q: What makes babies and children excellent secondary characters in romance novels?

A: I believe that the women who read these books either have families or would like to have families and nothing says “family” like children.

The use of children allows me to show certain traits in either the hero or heroine. Is he (or she) a harried person who suddenly must care for a foundling or a recently deceased relative’s child? How does he or she measure up to this challenge?  We go through a learning process with him (or her) that, if done right, is equal parts touching and funny and the reader, as well as the involved heroine or hero, gets to learn things about the other person that might not come out otherwise. It makes for a richer story and allows for a great many plot devices.  My very favourite example of this is not from a book but actually the first episode of Full House in which the hero’s best friend and brother-in-law have to change the baby’s full diaper for the very first time.  Tongs, an entire roll of paper towels, a turkey baster filled with water and a kitchen sink are involved.  Very funny, yet very heart-warming.  You take to the two characters on the spot!

When you come right down to it, I love writing about children.  They’re honest and speak from the heart.  Personally, I’ve always been a pushover for short people myself.  They come to my door with long faces and I wind up buying an entire year’s supply of double-sided, foil wrapping paper that their schools have them hawking and I really have no use for. But the short people leave happy and that’s all that counts.